East Coast Fall 2021 – Kansas City, Part Two

October 3 – October 6

Knowing that Bev wouldn’t arrive until late morning, McKenzie and Dillon off to work, and viewing a forecast for gorgeous weather we jumped on the opportunity to get a bike ride in.  After some sleuthing, Joanna discovered the Harry Wiggins Trolley Track Trail not far from the house, one we could easily ride to and so we pumped up the tires, filled the water bottles, and set off in search of adventure. 

Kansas City Trail and River Ramble

We picked up the trail as it parallels Worrall Road for most of its length.  Comprised of finely crushed gravel it is well maintained and easy to ride on with the exception that it has intersections at very short intervals with numerous streets, causing one to have to constantly slow down, look in both directions, and then cross. 

Not a long trail, we hit its terminus at Brush Creek and then joined its own path that runs up and down it.  We started off in one direction but soon hit an end point, so turned around and rode a couple of miles in the other direction, before again turning around to return to the Trolley Track Trail, which we followed south for some distance until we decided it was time to return to the house. 

Along the way though we stopped at a Pedego electric bike store to see if they could adjust Joanna’s disc brakes, which have long bedeviled us with their lack of adjustability.  While there I had a conversation with two ladies our age who had just purchased electric bikes and were looking forward to taking them in their 32-foot trailer on a long trip to Arizona. 

Joanna on the Trail

We would drop off Joanna’s bike later and pick it the same day, when Joanna found out that we could potentially get to the start of the Katy Trail from there (we had planned to do it in 2018 but had to abandon when I hurt my knee) and so we are now actively thinking about riding that trail when we come back in May next year for McKenzie and Dillon’s wedding. 

Katy Trail Map

We returned to the house to find that Bev had arrived and after cleaning up we all took off for a local Target to get a new blow-up bed for the house, as the one we were sleeping on wouldn’t hold air.  Too late in the afternoon for a big lunch, we did what any right-thinking person would do and stopped in at Betty Rae’s Ice Cream for two scoops apiece for Bev and I and an ice cream sandwich the size of a frisbee (OK, just a small frisbee) for Joanna. 

We finished off our sweet treats and hit the Target, then returned home for lots of conversation while we waited for Dillon and McKenzie to get home so that we could set out to celebrate his birthday that day at the restaurant of his choice, Parlor.  This is a food court with eight diverse culinary concepts, paired with inventive cocktails and craft beer, always a good bet for a group with their own set of diverse tastes. 

We parked close by and walked to the entrance only to discover that they were closed for a special event.  What!!  It reminded us of our first visit to KC with Dillon some years ago when the place he wanted to take us to, Mission Taco Joint, was closed.  This time we walked up the block to eventually dine at, you guessed it, Mission Taco.  It is next door to International Tap House, a place we simply must check out the next time we are in town. 

That Salad

We entered the taco shop and although it was a busy night, our party of five was quickly seated.  Joanna ordered a Schalfy Pumpkin Ale and I a Abbot Maibock.  Joanna and I would split a three-taco platter (Baja Fish, Yucatecan Pork, and Chicken Guisado), Refried Black Beans, Street Corn “Off the Cobb” and a chopped salad.  Along with the order of Guacamole, Chips and Salsa that the table consumed at the start, it ended up being way too much food for the two of us, but hey, that is what take home containers and refrigerators are for. 

The food was good although I couldn’t quite warm up to the default dressing that came with the salad and as such, I made a small amount of progress with it before abandoning.  Then again there was plenty of other food to consume.  We returned to the house for an evening of watching Ted Lasso and called it a night. 

Refried Black Beans

The next day would be full of war, as the three of us visited the National World War I Museum and Memorial, perched on a hill above Union Station.  We were here last year in November when we stopped in for a few days after leaving Alamogordo, New Mexico.  We didn’t visit the museum at that time, instead just taking in the view on a clear, cold, and windy day. 

That visit was spent at the base of the Liberty Tower, whose 217-foot-tall top, at night emits a flame effect from steam illuminated by bright red and orange lights.  The illusion of a burning pyre can be seen for some distance.  Overall, the memorial rises 265 feet above the surrounding area.

Union Station in 2020

This visit was warm but overcast and parking not far from the entrance, we walked to the front doors which are made from ornamental bronze, and entered the first-floor lobby, whose walls are finished in stone quarried in Kasota, Minnesota while its corridor and the grand stairway are finished in travertine imported from Italy.  

Grey Skies at the Museum

We started our visit with a 20-minute introductory video about the war, its causes, duration, and outcomes.  We left the auditorium after the movie to enter the exhibit space across a glass bridge above a field of 9,000 red poppies, each representing 1,000 combatant deaths.

The Poppies at the Entrance

Opened in 1926 as the 32,000-square-foot Liberty Memorial, it was designated in 2004 by the United States Congress as the country’s official war memorial and museum dedicated to World War I and is managed by a non-profit organization in cooperation with the Kansas City Board of Parks and Recreation Commissioners.  The museum focuses on global events from the causes of World War I before 1914 through the 1918 armistice and 1919 Paris Peace Conference.  

A Typical Tent for Two Men

Not quite as large or comprehensive as the WWII museum in New Orleans, it is still large enough to spend hours in it.  We started with the causes for the war, duplicating what we had seen in the video and then proceeded through a series of exhibits in chronological order with a mock-up of a trench, the types of barbed wire used, and lots of various kinds of guns, cannons, uniforms, and all of the minutiae of a war fought during that era. 

Eventually one finds themselves in the galleries devoted to America’s involvement, our countries participation helping to turn the tide of the war, along with the introduction of tanks which rendered barbed wire emplacements obsolete and began to signal the end of the horrendously deadly trench warfare. 

Trench Mock Up

To view an incredible movie about British trench life, I heartily recommend Peter Jackson’s, They Shall Not Grow Old.  He was approached by the Imperial War Museum’s archives to restore original footage, most previously unseen, all over 100 years old by the time of release.  As the original footage is all silent, they brought in lip readers to transcribe all that was being said in the footage and employed voice actors to provide the spoken dialogue. 

Bev with All Kinds of Cannons

A couple of hours later, having just touched the surface of the museum and its collections, we staggered to its small food operation for a packaged sandwich and drink and then returned to the house for a dinner of beef, chicken, and vegetable kabobs accompanied by sufficient quantities of beer and wine for that golden glow that good food, drink, and pleasant company can fill the house with.  And we will leave this post right there, a happy smile on our face as we recall these folks we love and cherish. 

Links

Harry Wiggins Trolley Track Trail: https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/missouri/harry-wiggins-trolley-track-trail

Pedego: https://www.pedegoelectricbikes.com/

Betty Rae’s: http://bettyraes.com/

Parlor: https://www.parlorkcmo.com/

Mission Taco Joint: https://www.missiontacojoint.com/

International Tap House: https://www.facebook.com/iTapXroads

National World War I Museum: https://www.theworldwar.org/

They Shall Not Grow Old: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/They_Shall_Not_Grow_Old

East Coast Fall 2021 – Kansas City, Part Two

October 3 – October 6

Knowing that Bev wouldn’t arrive until late morning, McKenzie and Dillon off to work, and viewing a forecast for gorgeous weather we jumped on the opportunity to get a bike ride in.  After some sleuthing, Joanna discovered the Harry Wiggins Trolley Track Trail not far from the house, one we could easily ride to and so we pumped up the tires, filled the water bottles, and set off in search of adventure. 

We picked up the trail as it parallels Worrall Road for most of its length.  Comprised of finely crushed gravel it is well maintained and easy to ride on with the exception that it has intersections at very short intervals with numerous streets, causing one to have to constantly slow down, look in both directions, and then cross. 

Not a long trail, we hit its terminus at Brush Creek and then joined its own path that runs up and down it.  We started off in one direction but soon hit an end point, so turned around and rode a couple of miles in the other direction, before again turning around to return to the Trolley Track Trail, which we followed south for some distance until we decided it was time to return to the house. 

Along the way though we stopped at a Pedego electric bike store to see if they could adjust Joanna’s disc brakes, which have long bedeviled us with their lack of adjustability.  While there I had a conversation with two ladies our age who had just purchased electric bikes and were looking forward to taking them in their 32-foot trailer on a long trip to Arizona. 

We would drop off Joanna’s bike later and pick it the same day, when Joanna found out that we could potentially get to the start of the Katy Trail from there (we had planned to do it in 2018 but had to abandon when I hurt my knee) and so we are now actively thinking about riding that trail when we come back in May next year for McKenzie and Dillon’s wedding. 

We returned to the house to find that Bev had arrived and after cleaning up we all took off for a local Target to get a new blow-up bed for the house, as the one we were sleeping on wouldn’t hold air.  Too late in the afternoon for a big lunch, we did what any right-thinking person would do and stopped in at Betty Rae’s Ice Cream for two scoops apiece for Bev and I and an ice cream sandwich the size of a frisbee (OK, just a small frisbee) for Joanna. 

We finished off our sweet treats and hit the Target, then returned home for lots of conversation while we waited for Dillon and McKenzie to get home so that we could set out to celebrate his birthday that day at the restaurant of his choice, Parlor.  This is a food court with eight diverse culinary concepts, paired with inventive cocktails and craft beer, always a good bet for a group with their own set of diverse tastes. 

We parked close by and walked to the entrance only to discover that they were closed for a special event.  What!!  It reminded us of our first visit to KC with Dillon some years ago when the place he wanted to take us to, Mission Taco Joint, was closed.  This time we walked up the block to eventually dine at, you guessed it, Mission Taco.  It is next door to International Tap House, a place we simply must check out the next time we are in town. 

We entered the taco shop and although it was a busy night, our party of five was quickly seated.  Joanna ordered a Schalfy Pumpkin Ale and I a Abbot Maibock.  Joanna and I would split a three-taco platter (Baja Fish, Yucatecan Pork, and Chicken Guisado), Refried Black Beans, Street Corn “Off the Cobb” and a chopped salad.  Along with the order of Guacamole, Chips and Salsa that the table consumed at the start, it ended up being way too much food for the two of us, but hey, that is what take home containers and refrigerators are for. 

The food was good although I couldn’t quite warm up to the default dressing that came with the salad and as such, I made a small amount of progress with it before abandoning.  Then again there was plenty of other food to consume.  We returned to the house for an evening of watching Ted Lasso and called it a night. 

The next day would be full of war, as the three of us visited the National World War I Museum and Memorial, perched on a hill above Union Station.  We were here last year in November when we stopped in for a few days after leaving Alamogordo, New Mexico.  We didn’t visit the museum at that time, instead just taking in the view on a clear, cold, and windy day. 

That visit was spent at the base of the Liberty Tower, whose 217-foot-tall top, at night emits a flame effect from steam illuminated by bright red and orange lights.  The illusion of a burning pyre can be seen for some distance.  Overall, the memorial rises 265 feet above the surrounding area.

This visit was warm but overcast and parking not far from the entrance, we walked to the front doors which are made from ornamental bronze, and entered the first-floor lobby, whose walls are finished in stone quarried in Kasota, Minnesota while its corridor and the grand stairway are finished in travertine imported from Italy.  We started our visit with a 20-minute introductory video about the war, its causes, duration, and outcomes.  We left the auditorium after the movie to enter the exhibit space across a glass bridge above a field of 9,000 red poppies, each representing 1,000 combatant deaths.

Opened in 1926 as the 32,000-square-foot Liberty Memorial, it was designated in 2004 by the United States Congress as the country’s official war memorial and museum dedicated to World War I and is managed by a non-profit organization in cooperation with the Kansas City Board of Parks and Recreation Commissioners.  The museum focuses on global events from the causes of World War I before 1914 through the 1918 armistice and 1919 Paris Peace Conference.  Visitors

Not quite as large or comprehensive as the WWII museum in New Orleans, it is still large enough to spend hours in it.  We started with the causes for the war, duplicating what we had seen in the video and then proceeded through a series of exhibits in chronological order with a mock-up of a trench, the types of barbed wire used, and lots of various kinds of guns, cannons, uniforms, and all of the minutiae of a war fought during that era. 

Eventually one finds themselves in the galleries devoted to America’s involvement, our countries participation helping to turn the tide of the war, along with the introduction of tanks which rendered barbed wire emplacements obsolete and began to signal the end of the horrendously deadly trench warfare.  To view an incredible movie about British trench life, I heartily recommend Peter Jackson’s, They Shall Not Grow Old.  He was approached by the Imperial War Museum’s archives to restore original footage, most previously unseen, all over 100 years old by the time of release.  As the original footage is all silent, they brought in lip readers to transcribe all that was being said in the footage and employed voice actors to provide the spoken dialogue. 

A couple of hours later, having just touched the surface of the museum and its collections, we staggered to its small food operation for a packaged sandwich and drink and then returned to the house for a dinner of beef, chicken, and vegetable kabobs accompanied by sufficient quantities of beer and wine for that golden glow that good food, drink, and pleasant company can fill the house with.  And we will leave this post right there, a happy smile on our face as we recall these folks we love and cherish. 

Links

Harry Wiggins Trolley Track Trail: https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/missouri/harry-wiggins-trolley-track-trail

Pedego: https://www.pedegoelectricbikes.com/

Betty Rae’s: http://bettyraes.com/

Parlor: https://www.parlorkcmo.com/

Mission Taco Joint: https://www.missiontacojoint.com/

International Tap House: https://www.facebook.com/iTapXroads

National World War I Museum: https://www.theworldwar.org/

They Shall Not Grow Old: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/They_Shall_Not_Grow_Old

Blog Post 10-31-21

East Coast Fall 2021 – Kansas City, Part Two

October 3 – October 6

Knowing that Bev wouldn’t arrive until late morning, McKenzie and Dillon off to work, and viewing a forecast for gorgeous weather we jumped on the opportunity to get a bike ride in.  After some sleuthing, Joanna discovered the Harry Wiggins Trolley Track Trail not far from the house, one we could easily ride to and so we pumped up the tires, filled the water bottles, and set off in search of adventure. 

We picked up the trail as it parallels Worrall Road for most of its length.  Comprised of finely crushed gravel it is well maintained and easy to ride on with the exception that it has intersections at very short intervals with numerous streets, causing one to have to constantly slow down, look in both directions, and then cross. 

Not a long trail, we hit its terminus at Brush Creek and then joined its own path that runs up and down it.  We started off in one direction but soon hit an end point, so turned around and rode a couple of miles in the other direction, before again turning around to return to the Trolley Track Trail, which we followed south for some distance until we decided it was time to return to the house. 

Along the way though we stopped at a Pedego electric bike store to see if they could adjust Joanna’s disc brakes, which have long bedeviled us with their lack of adjustability.  While there I had a conversation with two ladies our age who had just purchased electric bikes and were looking forward to taking them in their 32-foot trailer on a long trip to Arizona. 

We would drop off Joanna’s bike later and pick it the same day, when Joanna found out that we could potentially get to the start of the Katy Trail from there (we had planned to do it in 2018 but had to abandon when I hurt my knee) and so we are now actively thinking about riding that trail when we come back in May next year for McKenzie and Dillon’s wedding. 

We returned to the house to find that Bev had arrived and after cleaning up we all took off for a local Target to get a new blow-up bed for the house, as the one we were sleeping on wouldn’t hold air.  Too late in the afternoon for a big lunch, we did what any right-thinking person would do and stopped in at Betty Rae’s Ice Cream for two scoops apiece for Bev and I and an ice cream sandwich the size of a frisbee (OK, just a small frisbee) for Joanna. 

We finished off our sweet treats and hit the Target, then returned home for lots of conversation while we waited for Dillon and McKenzie to get home so that we could set out to celebrate his birthday that day at the restaurant of his choice, Parlor.  This is a food court with eight diverse culinary concepts, paired with inventive cocktails and craft beer, always a good bet for a group with their own set of diverse tastes. 

We parked close by and walked to the entrance only to discover that they were closed for a special event.  What!!  It reminded us of our first visit to KC with Dillon some years ago when the place he wanted to take us to, Mission Taco Joint, was closed.  This time we walked up the block to eventually dine at, you guessed it, Mission Taco.  It is next door to International Tap House, a place we simply must check out the next time we are in town. 

We entered the taco shop and although it was a busy night, our party of five was quickly seated.  Joanna ordered a Schalfy Pumpkin Ale and I a Abbot Maibock.  Joanna and I would split a three-taco platter (Baja Fish, Yucatecan Pork, and Chicken Guisado), Refried Black Beans, Street Corn “Off the Cobb” and a chopped salad.  Along with the order of Guacamole, Chips and Salsa that the table consumed at the start, it ended up being way too much food for the two of us, but hey, that is what take home containers and refrigerators are for. 

The food was good although I couldn’t quite warm up to the default dressing that came with the salad and as such, I made a small amount of progress with it before abandoning.  Then again there was plenty of other food to consume.  We returned to the house for an evening of watching Ted Lasso and called it a night. 

The next day would be full of war, as the three of us visited the National World War I Museum and Memorial, perched on a hill above Union Station.  We were here last year in November when we stopped in for a few days after leaving Alamogordo, New Mexico.  We didn’t visit the museum at that time, instead just taking in the view on a clear, cold, and windy day. 

That visit was spent at the base of the Liberty Tower, whose 217-foot-tall top, at night emits a flame effect from steam illuminated by bright red and orange lights.  The illusion of a burning pyre can be seen for some distance.  Overall, the memorial rises 265 feet above the surrounding area.

This visit was warm but overcast and parking not far from the entrance, we walked to the front doors which are made from ornamental bronze, and entered the first-floor lobby, whose walls are finished in stone quarried in Kasota, Minnesota while its corridor and the grand stairway are finished in travertine imported from Italy.  We started our visit with a 20-minute introductory video about the war, its causes, duration, and outcomes.  We left the auditorium after the movie to enter the exhibit space across a glass bridge above a field of 9,000 red poppies, each representing 1,000 combatant deaths.

Opened in 1926 as the 32,000-square-foot Liberty Memorial, it was designated in 2004 by the United States Congress as the country’s official war memorial and museum dedicated to World War I and is managed by a non-profit organization in cooperation with the Kansas City Board of Parks and Recreation Commissioners.  The museum focuses on global events from the causes of World War I before 1914 through the 1918 armistice and 1919 Paris Peace Conference.  Visitors

Not quite as large or comprehensive as the WWII museum in New Orleans, it is still large enough to spend hours in it.  We started with the causes for the war, duplicating what we had seen in the video and then proceeded through a series of exhibits in chronological order with a mock-up of a trench, the types of barbed wire used, and lots of various kinds of guns, cannons, uniforms, and all of the minutiae of a war fought during that era. 

Eventually one finds themselves in the galleries devoted to America’s involvement, our countries participation helping to turn the tide of the war, along with the introduction of tanks which rendered barbed wire emplacements obsolete and began to signal the end of the horrendously deadly trench warfare.  To view an incredible movie about British trench life, I heartily recommend Peter Jackson’s, They Shall Not Grow Old.  He was approached by the Imperial War Museum’s archives to restore original footage, most previously unseen, all over 100 years old by the time of release.  As the original footage is all silent, they brought in lip readers to transcribe all that was being said in the footage and employed voice actors to provide the spoken dialogue. 

A couple of hours later, having just touched the surface of the museum and its collections, we staggered to its small food operation for a packaged sandwich and drink and then returned to the house for a dinner of beef, chicken, and vegetable kabobs accompanied by sufficient quantities of beer and wine for that golden glow that good food, drink, and pleasant company can fill the house with.  And we will leave this post right there, a happy smile on our face as we recall these folks we love and cherish. 

Links

Harry Wiggins Trolley Track Trail: https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/missouri/harry-wiggins-trolley-track-trail

Pedego: https://www.pedegoelectricbikes.com/

Betty Rae’s: http://bettyraes.com/

Parlor: https://www.parlorkcmo.com/

Mission Taco Joint: https://www.missiontacojoint.com/

International Tap House: https://www.facebook.com/iTapXroads

National World War I Museum: https://www.theworldwar.org/

They Shall Not Grow Old: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/They_Shall_Not_Grow_Old

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